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Should Your Teen Consider Alternative High Schools?

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Quick Links: Troubled Teens | Quiz: Is Your Teen At-Risk?

"The object of education is to prepare the young to educate themselves throughout their lives." ~ Robert Maynard Hutchins, Educator

Education is vitally important to your teens' future, but not all teens perform well in the traditional public school setting and many are at high risk for dropping out. 

The good news is there are numerous alternatives to the traditional public school setting. Teens who perform poorly in a traditional academic program often do much better in an alternative high school.

Who Should Consider an Alternative High School?

Any teen who isn't succeeding in their current academic setting, to include students who:

  • have poor grades
  • are behind in academic credits
  • refuse to attend school
  • have a learning style that doesn’t match what’s being taught
  • frequently engage in conflict with teachers
  • have been kicked out or suspended from school
  • are unable to attend due to illness 
  • require individual attention
  • experience social difficulties in the school setting
  • have a learning disability
  • are pregnant, or parenting
  • have dropped out, or plan to drop out, of school
  • have a special talent or interest not offered in public school

What Does an Alternative High School Offer?

Alternative high schools offer an array of options for earning a high school diploma that are very different from the public school model

Since these schools are designed to teach students at risk of failing, they provide more support and attention; classes are smaller, instruction individualized, and scheduling more flexible. In addition to academics, the social and emotional needs of students are addressed.

Some alternative schools offer unique opportunities such as studying subjects not offered in traditional schools, internships in the community or high-level vocational training.

Quick Links: Troubled Teens | Quiz: Is Your Teen At-Risk?

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